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688 Action Items Found

  • Food Access, Security and Health 5.1.3 Encourage and support nonprofit hospitals in supporting and partnering with community-based programs that promote healthy food access and nutrition education. Support pilot programs that provide direct support to patients in acquiring healthy, such as on-site fresh produce sales to immediately fill fruit and vegetable prescriptions.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 5.1.4 Study the Determination of Need process and related community health improvement resources for opportunities to expand and enhance health care facilities’ role in promoting and increasing access to healthy food. Innovative examples include mobile markets and fresh produce kiosks inside hospitals.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 5.1.5 Encourage medical institutions to modify food procurement contract language to purchase more locally produced healthy foods, including setting local food procurement benchmark of at least 20%.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 5.1.6 Encourage and support greater nutrition education in medical schools and relevant trainings for all medical professionals.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 5.2.1 Provide SNAP application assistance at the time of enrollment in public health insurance programs, as well as providing easy-to-use directories and information about local Department of Transitional Assistance Offices and services, nutrition trainings, and WIC application assistance.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 5.2.2 Encourage insurance providers to expand and offer discounts or rebates on premiums for purchase of healthy foods including CSA memberships and documented farmers market purchases, similar to health club discounts currently offered, or when prescribed as part of a fruit and vegetable prescription program.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 6.1.1 Identify ways and implement strategies to increase distribution and production of culturally appropriate and preferred foods available for purchase through MEFAP.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 6.1.2 Modify food procurement contract language to utilize at least 10% of MEFAP dollars to purchase locally produced, healthy food.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 6.1.3 Identify what, if any, shelf-stable, non-perishable food products purchased through MEFAP have the potential to be grown or produced in Massachusetts, and support the production of identified item(s) for inclusion in the program.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 6.1.4 Identify capacity and efficiency limitations related to the distribution of locally produced, healthy food in emergency food distribution facilities, such as refrigeration, storage, and timely acceptance of donations that may be limiting the capacity of food pantries and meals programs. Identify funding and implement solutions.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 6.2.1 Scale existing relationships between hunger relief organizations and farms to increase distribution of locally produced, healthy foods. Identify and support establishment of new partnerships, including provision of public and private support as needed.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 6.2.2 Foster relationships between hunger relief organizations and fishermen to increase the distribution of locally caught fish, with a focus on distributing lesser known and eaten species that are abundant in Massachusetts.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 6.2.3 Consider the need for a community of practice among food pantry and meals providers to share best practices and promote communication.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 7.1.1 Support the creation and use of community “scorecards” to assess the accessibility of healthy and local food within one or more municipalities or region.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 7.1.2 Work with Massachusetts Department of Transportation (MassDOT) and the staff of Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) to work with municipalities and conduct gap analyses that focus on the availability of healthy food, especially among people who experience health disparities related to nutrition or are food insecure, especially seniors and people with disabilities. The purpose of these analyses is to better understand specific challenges and more adequately plan responsive local transportation programs and related efforts that improve healthy food access. Support partnership with existing initiatives like Transportation for Massachusetts to identify ways to address challenges.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 7.1.3 Continue to support and expand Mass in Motion and similar municipal programs like food policy councils, and leverage existing Mass in Motion initiatives toward a “Health in All Policies” model that integrates health-related considerations into decision-making and planning throughout municipal and state agencies.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 7.2.1 Encourage Metropolitan Planning Organizations (MPOs) and their Joint Committees on Transportation (JTCs) to add criteria for accessibility to healthy and local foods to project evaluations for regional transportation plans and to the annual scoring of projects for inclusion and prioritization in the regional and state Transportation Improvement Program.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 7.2.2 Engage and leverage regional economic coordinating councils to advance healthy food accessibility opportunities in their plans and support the implementation of solutions with regional stakeholders.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 7.2.3 Develop more regional transportation options in rural areas to help improve access to grocery stores for people who live who live long distances from grocery stores, especially seniors, and those with disabilities.
  • Food Access, Security and Health 7.4.1 Support mobile farmers markets and mobile grocery markets through local food policy councils, anchor institutions, nonprofits, and agency resources. Encourage partnerships with local transit authorities, farms, distributors, farmers markets, and other transportation providers.