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162 Action Items Found

  • Land 1.7.1 Train Agriculture and Conservation Commissions on actions farmers may take under current law to manage on and off-farm beaver activity to avoid property damage. If needed, consider changes to state law to allow farmers recourse in the event of off-farm beaver activity that is damaging a farm’s crops or farmland.
  • Land 3.3.4 Encourage and support Agricultural Commissions and, in communities where there are no Agricultural Commissions, other municipal boards, land trusts, and farm organizations, in: educating landowners about Chapter 61/61A/61B, farmland protection and conservation programs, and land listing, linking and matching services; inventorying current and potential farmland in town; and identifying opportunities for restoring active farming on land that has been abandoned.
  • Land 3.4.3 Provide more public education on urban food production techniques in community gardens and home gardens, such as growing vegetables, composting, keeping bees, chickens, and other animals.
  • Land 3.4.4 Provide more public education on best management practices for urban gardening in locations with known or suspected soil contamination. Provide funding for soil testing.
  • Land 3.6.2 Develop guidance for farmers and municipal officials around solar development and the types of arrays and installation techniques that minimize the long-term impact on agricultural resources.
  • Land 3.8.3 Pursue a program that would allow towns to obtain better insurance rates if Conservation Commission members attend trainings, similar to local Planning Board training discounts.
  • Land 3.8.4 Encourage greater communication and joint training, workshop presentations, and fact sheet development between MA Association of Agricultural Commissions and MA Association of Conservation Commissions.
  • Land 3.9.2 Expand farm succession planning services for farmers. Consider models such as UMass’ Your Forest, Your Legacy program, Land for Good and various programs the U.S. Forest Service is doing with forestland owners.
  • Land 3.9.3 Increase funding and technical assistance for farmland succession planning and matching services through state, federal, and NGO programs.
  • Land 3.15.1 Develop a more flexible Conservation Restriction that allows for commercial agriculture in situations where land being protected is suitable for agriculture. Educate land use attorneys and land trust staff on these terms and conditions.
  • Land 3.18.3 Provide education and technical assistance to builders, developers, and municipal building authorities on green roof installation and maintenance, edible landscaping, and other alternative methods for growing food in an urban environment, including living walls, vertical greenhouses, hydroponics, and aquaponics.
  • Land 4.1.1 Educate farmers, including beginning and urban farmers about state and federal conservation programs.
  • Land 4.1.2 Expand and improve technical assistance to farmers and farmland owners to assist with conservation planning and accessing state and federal conservation programs. Advocate for increased state and federal funding for this purpose.
  • Inputs 1.1.1 Promote and leverage the MassDEP technical assistance service, RecyclingWorks, to help food waste generators comply with the waste ban.
  • Inputs 1.1.2 Provide technical assistance to municipalities to introduce their own voluntary programs for residential food waste disposal or food waste from institutions disposal below the one ton/week level.
  • Inputs 1.1.3 Explore expanding the statewide Commerical Food Waste Disposal Ban to phase in smaller food waste generators and residential food waste over time.
  • Inputs 1.2.1 Initiate a statewide food waste reduction campaign similar to the United Kingdom’s “Love Food Hate Waste” campaign or California’s “Food is Too Good to Waste” campaign to provide consumer education and highlight the environmental benefits of reducing food waste.
  • Inputs 1.2.2 Align state initiatives with the USEPA and USDA’s national goal to reduce food waste by 50% by 2030.
  • Inputs 1.2.3 Launch an educational campaign to teach consumers about when a product is still safe to eat, even past the expiration/sell by date.
  • Inputs 1.2.4 Clarify expiration/sell by dates, and reduce the number of foods that require a date label, using information from Harvard Law School’s Food Law and Policy Clinic.[1]